“Need a whole new syntax for fatigue on days like this,’”

David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest (via love—literature)

(via tea-and-bookishness)

waltandmickey:

First Production Photos from Disney and Sondheim’s “Into The Woods”

(Photo Credits)

(via twirlyeleven)

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

A town known as the “town of books”, Hay-on-Wye is located on the Welsh / English border in the United Kingdom and is a bibliophile’s sanctuary.

(via polypotter)

colourbomb:

A.Richard Allen

colourbomb:

A.Richard Allen

(via thegirlinthelibrary)

“I also believe that thinking books would mainly just want to be read. They probably wouldn’t care how or when, as long as they formed a relationship with the reader. When certain scaly, phallic looking billionaires try to control the way they reach readers, or prevent them from being read for weeks, they’d probably feel imprisoned, pimped, and defiled. They would probably think that type of slimy overlord doesn’t value them or the people who throw obscene amounts of money into his kingdom. They might even riot. They might go all Les Miserables on him.”

from If Books Were Sentient by Aram Mrjoian (via bookriot)
tattoolit:

When I decided to get a literary tattoo, I went looking through my bookshelves to find A SINGLE favourite. I couldn’t do it. This tree includes quotes from “The Name of the Wind” by Patrick Rothfuss, “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern, “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austin, “Oh the Places you’ll go” by Dr. Seuss, “Ella Enchanted” by Gail Carson Levine, “A wind in the Door” by Madeline L’Engle, “Romeo and Juliet”, William Shakespeare, “The Time Traveller’s Wife” by Audrey Niffenegger, “Kushiel’s Dart” by Jacqueline Carey, “The Big Orange Splot” by Daniel Manus Pinkwater, “Gone with the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell and “Horton Hears a Who” by Dr. Seuss. Done by Eric Brunning  at Lotus Land Tattoo Shop in Vancouver, BC.

tattoolit:

When I decided to get a literary tattoo, I went looking through my bookshelves to find A SINGLE favourite. I couldn’t do it. This tree includes quotes from “The Name of the Wind” by Patrick Rothfuss, “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern, “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austin, “Oh the Places you’ll go” by Dr. Seuss, “Ella Enchanted” by Gail Carson Levine, “A wind in the Door” by Madeline L’Engle, “Romeo and Juliet”, William Shakespeare, “The Time Traveller’s Wife” by Audrey Niffenegger, “Kushiel’s Dart” by Jacqueline Carey, “The Big Orange Splot” by Daniel Manus Pinkwater, “Gone with the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell and “Horton Hears a Who” by Dr. Seuss. Done by Eric Brunning  at Lotus Land Tattoo Shop in Vancouver, BC.

(via escapingintoabook)

bluestockingbookworm:

iguanamouth:

UNUSUAL HOARD commission for fatetea, this dragon looks like someone id wanna hang out with

Bookish people of tumblr, I have found our universal selfie. Yes it is drawn (by an amazing artist) Yes it is a dragon.

bluestockingbookworm:

iguanamouth:

UNUSUAL HOARD commission for fatetea, this dragon looks like someone id wanna hang out with

Bookish people of tumblr, I have found our universal selfie. Yes it is drawn (by an amazing artist) Yes it is a dragon.

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.
PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

(Source: stupidimagesforcraziestpeople, via brokenblissfulness)